antibiotics in early childhood, type 1 diabetes, research, study

Can antibiotics cause type 1 diabetes? Researchers are working hard trying to figure out the causes of type 1. According to a new study, antibiotics might be a culprit. Particularly when taken in very early childhood, antibiotics can alter the immune system in such a way to make the body more at risk for type 1.

New study from NYU

New research from NYU Medical School found that taking antibiotics in early childhood could lead to increased risk of type 1 diabetes. The research team studied bacterial DNA in mice.

As rates of exposure to antibiotics have gone up, so have incidents of type 1. Even one (1) course of antibiotics in childhood can increase the risk.

Antibiotics can cause the immune system to develop abnormally, which can in turn lead to pancreatic damage, type 1, and various other illnesses. Specifically when taken in the first few years of life, antibiotics can disrupt an immune system that’s educating itself in healthy gut microbes.

Advertisements

Where the findings lead

These findings could lead to the development of a probiotic to restore healthy immune cells in the guts of newborns.

Can antibiotics cause type 1 diabetes? It seems there is an association. More research will need to be done to prove that the association between antibiotics and type 1 is actually a causal link.

SHARE
Joan Biddle
Joan Biddle is a Content Developer at Diabetic Nation. Her years of editing, research and writing allow her to create detailed, reliable articles that help people navigate complicated topics. She enjoys movies, reading, poetry and art.