diabetes top news, insulin, diabetes, illegal insulin

Illegal insulin: Desperate diabetes patients turn to black market for affordable drugs

BY CBS NEW YORK: After years of rising insulin prices, a growing number of diabetics and their families are now facing some tough choices when it comes to paying for the drug.

Some are turning to the black market to buy illegal insulin.

“So many people are dying because they just can’t afford their insulin,” parent Doreen Rudolph said.

Rudolph says she’s doing everything she can to make sure that doesn’t happen to her 27-year-old daughter, Nicole, a Type-1 diabetic.

When her daughter was first diagnosed, Rudolph says a vile of insulin cost about $21.

“Then it went up to 31, 45, 200, and then $400 a vile,” the desperate parent explained.

Even with insurance, Nicole now pays $1,300 every three months out of pocket.

“You pay or you die,” Rudolph conceded. (read more)

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Diabetes vaccine may follow from celiac disease research

BY HEALIO: The venture philanthropy organization JDRF T1D Fund is investing in ImmusanT, a clinical-stage company looking to develop a vaccine to prevent type 1 diabetes following on its peptide immunotherapy program for celiac disease, the two entities announced in a press release.

ImmusanT has been successful in phase 1 studies with a peptide-based therapeutic vaccine (Nexvax2) for celiac disease. JDRF T1D’s investment was made to support ImmusanT as it attempts to convert lessons from the celiac program into a “novel vaccine candidate” for type 1 diabetes. (read more)

BY SUSAN ADCOX: Turmeric is the spice that’s yellow but not too mellow. A favorite of foodies, turmeric is gaining attention for its purported health benefits, including possible applications in the treatment of diabetes. Even the medical establishment is keeping its eye on this unique spice.

Turmeric is what makes mustard yellow. If you’re a fan of curries, you have eaten plenty of it, but you may not know that it has been used in ayurvedic medicine for centuries. Practitioners consider it an anti-inflammatory. Modern researchers are primarily interested in turmeric for its active compounds called curcuminoids, of which curcumin is the most abundant and the most studied. (read more)

New approach could better predict coronary artery disease in people with type 2 diabetes

BY JACK WOODFIELD: Genetic analysis could be used to determine whether someone with type 2 diabetes is at risk of developing coronary artery disease (CAD).

Joslin Diabetes Center scientists in the US say that adding genetics to future analyses could help further predict someone’s CAD risk better than existing methods.

There are currently established indicators for CAD risk within type 2 diabetes, such as weight, blood glucose levels, cholesterol, blood pressure and smoking history.  (read more)

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People protest insulin prices outside Eli Lilly

BY ANNA CARRERA: People came to Indianapolis from across the country to protest the price of insulin. They chanted and waved signs outside the main building of Eli Lilly on Saturday afternoon.

Those we talked with say insulin costs are growing and they feel like companies are putting profits over people. One woman told us balancing medical costs has turned into a life or death decision.

“It’s $1,300 a month for me and there are people who can’t buy it, so there are people who are rationing,” said Karyn Wofford, who has type 1 diabetes and came to the protest from Georgia. “They’re cutting their life short, whether it be right now or whether it be years down the road, so this is a very critical fight that needs to happen right now.” (read more)

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Joan Biddle
Joan Biddle is a Content Developer at Diabetic Nation. Her years of editing, research and writing allow her to create detailed, reliable articles that help people navigate complicated topics. She enjoys movies, reading, poetry and art.