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Top Diabetes News of Today

5 Yoga moves to curb down diabetes

BY SUDHAKAR JHA: If you are diagnosed with pre-diabetic symptoms or worse, already have type 2 diabetes, then there aren’t many things that you can do reverse it. But apart from maintaining a healthy lifestyle, yoga is something that has shown significant health improvement in diabetics. And we aren’t saying it, science is. A study published in the Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research showed that yoga is an effective way to reduce blood glucose levels in T2D patients.

Some of the yoga asanas include breathing exercises and postures that specially target the pancreas. They improve the blood flow to the pancreas and rejuvenate the cells to produce insulin for the body. Incredible, isn’t it? So here is your guide to the 4 moves. But before you begin, here’s your guide. You should practice these moves before meals but remember to have glucid liquids. As far as the timings are concerned, you can do them in the morning and evening for up to 40 to 60 minutes. Also, when you are starting, try to hold on to each posture for about five seconds, or as long as is comfortable.. (read more)

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The shape of things to come: How moulding technology could help diabetes

BY SCHOTTLI: High-performance injection moulds for challenging applications in medical technology require precision and skill. Schöttli, a Husky Company, constructs high-performance moulds in large quantities for medical applications including modern diabetes therapy, producing moulds for syringes to artificial pancreas devices.

Globally, as many as 425 million people, which is 9% of the world adult population, are affected by diabetes. The persistent high blood sugar levels of diabetics can lead to serious complications, including strokes, heart attacks, amputations, blindness and the necessity for dialysis treatments. Early diagnosis and proper diabetes management are critical. (read more)

New virtual diabetes clinic may help manage condition of people with Type 2 diabetes

BY NEWS-MEDICAL: Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Georgia is taking an innovative approach to helping its consumers who have been diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes manage their condition to improve their health through a new virtual diabetes clinic with a smartphone app and monitoring tools.

Participants in Onduo’s virtual diabetes clinic will learn more about their body’s response to meals, medication and exercise by tracking their glucose readings in almost real time and seeing patterns that could explain the spikes and dips in their reading numbers. Consumers also will have ongoing access to a care team — including coaches, diabetes educators and doctors — for support in managing their diabetes. (read more)

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High prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome may favor screening in diabetes

BY ENDOCRINOLOGY ADVISOR: The high prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) in patients with both type 1 diabetes (T1D) or type 2 (T2D) justifies screening in this population, according to a review article published in Diabetes and Metabolism.

A panel of French expert endocrinologists and pneumologists conducted a systematic review of the scientific evidence in order to evaluate the epidemiologic association between OSAS and all forms of diabetes, as well as the expected benefits/limitations of OSAS treatment in this population and to offer guidance on screening for OSAS. (read more)

BY LAUREN FITZPATRICK: Background checks that sidelined a number of nurses caring for Chicago Public Schools students at the start of the year have made an already tenuous nursing situation worse, a number of parents say. And recent instructions given to some CPS nurses encouraging them to cut back on care for some kids with diabetes “due to the significant number of newly diagnosed students who require daily nursing services” adds new worry to families of schoolchildren with chronic conditions. CPS officials will be meeting Monday with the parent group Raise Your Hand. The group’s founder, Wendy Katten, called that a “positive” development. (read more)